One of famous Mulackstraße “Destillen” (cheap bars with basic food offer) on the corner of Ruckerstraße in Berlin’s old and no-longer existing Jewish district known as Scheunenviertel (Barn District), inhabited mostly by East-European Jews. The dairy of H. Ewald could be found at Ruckerstraße 3.
(Photo by Berlin’s most famous cartoonist & photographer as well as social critic, Heinrich Zille). Image in public domain.

“At 11.00 at night Mulackstraße looks like a quarter of an excavated city. On the corner Schönhauser Straße a single streetlight squints at it sheepishly from across the road. A girl patrols the street, incessantly and at a steady pace like a pendulum, as if set in motion by an invisible clockwork.”

from Joseph roth “Neue Berliner Zeitung – 12-uhr-Blatt” (from a series of texts about berlin’s dives published between 23rd and 28th of ferbuary 1921)

k

Between 1961 and 1989 border crossing Heinrich-Heine-Straße joined/divided West Berlin and East Berlin. It was erected along Prinzenstraße in western Kreuzberg and former Neanderstraße in what used to be East-Berlin district of Mitte. The name “Neanderstraße” vanished in 1960 when on July 22 the street officially became Heinrich-Heine-Straße.

Interestingly, the change also applied to a section of Prinzenstraße between Sebastianstraße and Annenstraße – obviously to the one located in the Eastern Zone of the divided city. The name “Prinzenstraße” commemorated Prussian Crown Prince Wilhelm who went on to become first King and the Kaiser Wilhelm I. A fact which caused some unease on the eastern side of the divide (the Hohenzollerns were high on the pet-hate list of the East German ruling party) and led to the aforementioned adjustment.

The photo above, taken by an amateur Berlin photographer, Roehrensee, in December 1989 shows the Kreuzberg side of the crossing seen from the island in the middle of the Moritzplatz where the photographer’s shadow points towards the east. But the crossing you see in the background was just a small section of the facility – its western entrance/exit as it was.

BorBoder-crossing Heinrich-Heine-Straße in 1968 (photo via Stasi-Mediathek, from Polizeihistorische Sammlung).

In between the latter and a similar arrangement on the opposite side of the crossing in East Berlin there lie a slalom of massive concrete blocks whose main purpose was to slow down the traffic and prevent anyone from gaining enough speed to endanger the security of the control point in both Prinzen and in Heinrich-Heine-Straße. Maximum speed within the border-crossing route was 10km/h.

This more or less standard precaution – not only between Kreuzberg and Mitte but on other border-crossings, too – proved to be lethally efficient. On April 17, 1962 Klaus Brueske, a 24-year-old lorry-driver from Berlin-Friedrichshain, and two of his friends, sped towards the border at 70km/h, trying to break through the border road-barriers in Heinrich-Heine-Straße in a truck loaded with gravel. Brueske, disillusioned with the situation in East Berlin and still mourning the loss of his job with the West Berlin engineering company, AEG (which he gave up after the Berlin Wall separated his home-district from his workplace), hoped to be able to reach West Berlin territory by simply going through the boom barriers put there into place.

The plan could have worked – the border was not as impermeable yet as it became later – and, in fact it, it did. But at the ultimate price. One of the border guards opened fire at the vehicle, shooting 14 times and hitting two of the three young men inside. The lorry came to a halt already in West Berlin, crashing heads-on against a wall in Prinzenstraße 34.

The lorry used by Brueske and his friends after it crashed against the wall (photo from the Polizeihistorische Sammlung)

After all three escapees had been taken to Urban-Krankenhaus in Grimmstraße on the southern side of the Landwehrkanal in Kreuzberg, where Karl Brüske was pronounced dead upon arrival. However, the cause of death were not the two bullets which hit his neck. It was asphyxia. Klaus Brueske died of suffocation, buried under the gravel he had earlier loaded onto the lorry. He was the 16th victim of the Berlin Wall – 16th person to die trying to leave the Eastern Sector of Berlin. The 16th Maueropfer, “the wall victim”.

Two years later another young man would attempt an escape on the same spot and using the same method. Although his escape was part of a drama and not of a plan. On December 25, 1965 27-year-old Heinz Schöneberger from West Germany was lethally wounded by a hand-gun bullet shot at him as the young man was only five metres away from the West Berlin territory.

He and his brother, driving a Ford Taunus hoped to be able to smuggle two East-German women out of the DDR (German Democratic Republic). The women, hidding under the front and the back seats, risked their lives as much as the Schöneberger brothers. It became terribly clear after the car had been stopped by the East German border control.

The same border-crossing photographed by Hans Seiler in 1968 (image via Landesarchiv Berlin).

After ordering the brothers to step out of the car, the guards discovered one of the young women under the back seat. Not waiting for the handcuffs to be snapped around his wrists, Heinz Schöneberger jumped back into the vehicle, locked all doors from inside and sped towards the West Berlin side of the border. Unable to go faster – the concrete slalom route did its job just as expected – he stopped, sprang out of the car, in an attempt to sprint the remaining ten metres.

He died on the western side of the border.

There are events in the history of Berlin that are simply unforgettable – some of them disturbing and some remembered with joy. We all know the former but might not be aware of many of the latter. Here, therefore, a short snippet from a June day in 1932 that no-one who experienced it first-hand would ever forget. And many made it to the Müggelsee.

Dornier Do X” taking off for its first flight to the USA in November 1930. the machine could reach the speed of 200 km/h. (image via Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-10659).

On this day in 1932 the largest Flugschiff (flying boat) in the world, the magnificent Dornier DO X, which landed on the lake a week before, saw nearly ten thousand visitors – or rather, the visitors saw the DO X. From up close and inside. A rare privilege made available to excited Berliners and guests from Brandenburg on June 1. the twelve-engine giant docked before a popular lake café, “Rübezahl” (it still exists albeit in a new form).

For the price of 50 Pfennig (10 Pfennig for school children groups accompanied by a teacher and for students from Monday to Friday) curious crowds could admire the wonder of German engineering from 9 AM until 8 PM on weekdays and from 8 AM until 8 PM at weekends. Twelve hours might sound like a lot but do consider: on the very first day as many as 9,000 people walked down the thirty-metre wooden pier built between the lakeshore at “Rübezahl” and the side of Dornier DO X.

Dornier DO X and its visitors on the Müggelsee in June 1932. (Photo by Charlotte Krause, collection of Deutsches Historisches Museum Berlin).

One day later that number grew to 11,000 and the small, enchanting and rather quiet Berlin locality of Friedrichshagen, with the S-Bahnhof used by most guests on their way to the Müggelsee, filled up with never-seen masses of people. All of them headed for the Spreetunnel, the pedestrian tunnel under the section of the river Spree right where it leaves the lake on its way towards the city centre.

By June 3 it became clear that the situation had got out of control and that the numbers of arriving DO X aficionados needed to be reduced. After a life-threatening incident on the makeshift pier that morning, school-groups got a temporary ban on touring the machine and those who had been planning to visit DO X on Sunday were asked to re-consider. They would most likely be waiting in vain. In order to relieve Friedrichshagen, a special bus-line No. 27 was opened between S-Bahnhof Köpenick and Müggelheim with a stop next to the “Rübezahl“. The line was promoted with a slogan: “A Land-Omnibus goes to the Air-Omnibus”.

For many people those May and June weeks in 1932 at the Müggelsee were highlights of their lifetime, memories which accompanied them for the rest of their lives. Especially for one person, the 68-year-old Frau Klara Schmidt from Scheilberstraße in Baumschulenweg. She was the 100,000th visitor on board of the DO X and to celebrate the fact was invited to join the crew and their guests on a promotional flight on board of the giant on June the 23rd. She took the invitation and went up in the air together with her husband.

Dornier DO X, possibly the most magnificent and elegant flying machine ever built, left Berlin on June 24th 1932: its itinerary took it this time from the Müggelsee to Stettin (today’s Szczecin in Poland). But despite it exceptional size and qualities, the flying boat, which arrived in Berlin from New York where it had spent the previous winter after having visited Rio de Janeiro and the Caribbean Islands, did not have any glorious future before it.

DO X on the Müggelsee in June 1932. Photo by Mr Norbert Radtke, copyright Mr Albert Radtke (licenced CC).

Dornier DO X’s dimensions became its curse. Its long rump turned out to be its weakest point when landing on even moderately sized waves. After a near-crash-landing in Passau a year later, the machine began to lose its sponsors and became a financial disaster. Two years later it was dismantled in Travemünde and shipped to Berlin-Moabit where it became the largest and one of the most popular exhibition objects at the German Aviation Museum. Less than a decade later Dornier Do X was shattered to pieces during an air-raid and eventually burnt down. A water giant was swallowed by flames.

Dornier DO X (X stood for “secret” – other Dornier machines were named after water creatures like whales) at the no-longer existing Deutsches Luftfahrtsammlung in Berlin-Moabit. (image via flugrevue.de from the collection of Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin)

Book recommendation: Rolf Kießhauer & Andreas Horn “Die Sensation vom Müggelsee: Landung des Flugschiffes “DO-X D-1929”, published 2011 in the series “Friedrichshagener Hefte” No. 62 and available via Antiquariat Brandel in Scharnweberstraße 50 in Berlin-Friedrichshagen.

Weißensee – until 2001 an independent Berlin borough but now just a locality within the new super-borough of Pankow – is mostly known for three things: the Weißer See (a picturesque inner-city lake), the Jewish Cemetery (largest in Europe!) and the Delphi cinema (one of the oldest, still open Berlin picture shows, whose fabulously imperfect interior played the role of the 1929 “Moka Efti” café and dance hall in the TV series Babylon Berlin).

Jewish Cemetery in Weißensee opened in September 1880 (photo own).

The lake has been a cooling magnet for sun- and water-hungry crowds for well over a century. It still is. On warm days you will find said crowds strolling around its shore, clinging onto the precious lawn- or sand-spot along the waterline or bobbing on the latter’s surface like an inflatable armada of pink plastic flamingos (or rubber doughnuts). And sooner or later nearly all of these people will have visited the Milchhäuschen, an elegant mid-1970s café on the western shore of the lake, straight across the water from the lido.

“Milchhäuschen” and its guests photographed in 1982 by a brilliant photographer, Gerd Danigel (ddr-fotograf.de) (Licence: Creative Commons)

Ask anyone who grew up in Berlin-Weißensee and the Milchhäuschen is as certain to pop up in their long-forgotten tales of the sun-drenched days at the lake as the plastic inflatable flamingos are sure to appear on its surface today. You went to the lake, you went for a swim and after warming yourself up in the sun, you heard your parents say the magic words: “Ick schwitze wie ‘n Braten! Wolln wa Eis essen?“*

For generations of Berliners and Weißenseers this small place at the lake has been a thick thread in that warm worn-out cardigan known as childhood memories.

Interestingly, it is not the first Milchhäuschen that stood on this spot. Until 1965 that name belonged to a lovely half-timbered cottage with a closed wood-and-glass veranda. It was one of the only two buildings erected in the 1880s as part of a never-realised project, an amusement park “Kopenhagener Tivoli”. In 1905 local Weißensee authorities bought it along with the rest of the park and by 1913 had the cottage converted to a place where local families – and children in particular – could enjoy a glass of fresh milk and healthy dairy products.

The Weißer See in Weißensee in 1914 (from 1914 Berlin Baedeker guide).

Drinking good quality milk – fresh, free of pollution and, first of foremost, coming from healthy and TB-free cows (cows can pass tuberculosis onto humans) – was one of the basic measures to boost the health of the youngest city-dwellers (a practice which held in many places – like Poland, for instance – until late in the 1980s). That is why Berlin had more of such “milk bars” (one of the more famous ones stood in Viktoriapark in Kreuzberg).

The milk and dairy products sold at the original Milchhäuschen in Weißensee came not from the cowsheds and meadows of Brandenburg but from… the local hospital. The Säugling- und Kinderkrankenhaus (Infant and Children Hospital) in Hansastraße – the first municipal infant and children hospital in Prussia – kept its own herd to provide nourishing milk to its young patients. The excess of it could be sold at a small profit.

But it was not about money. The terrifying mortality rates among infants and young children in Berlin as well as its surrounding cities and rural communities – until 1920 Weißensee was one of the latter – made the local authorities act before it was too late. Just to give you a sense of how appalling and alarming the situation in Berlin was: in 1900 and 1901 around 30% of all new-borns died within the first year. Most of them in summer, in July and August, and mostly due to infections of the digestive system and diarrhoea.

Historische Postkarte Vorderansicht des Säuglings- und Kinderkrankenhaus Weißensee, Hansastraße (Kniprodeallee), um 1920.
Infant and Children Hospital (image via berlin.de)

Why were the numbers so high? And why in summer? The hygiene standards were only one factor. The other one was the plain fact that most mothers had no way of breastfeeding their infants: they spent most of their days working very hard indeed, forced to entrust their babies with relatives, neighbours or older children. Who fed them cow milk. On hot days even fresh milk went sour fast and bacteria spread.

Toddlers and older children were often undernourished, too, and cow milk was a source of many crucial nutritives for them. That explains the idea behind the Milchhäuschen – or Milchwirtschaften as they were sometimes called. They were one way of alleviating the dreadful situation.

The Weißensee Milchhäuschen did exactly that – it helped save and strengthen the children by improving their health. And it definitely made both them and their parents happy by offering fresh yoghurt, cottage cheese and sweet milk-pudding.

Neither the First nor the Second World War brought an end to that tradition. After Germany’s capitulation in May 1945 it did not take long for the place’s fans to return in the hope of finding a bit of normality and that taste of sun-drenched afternoons they remembered from before their world had fallen apart.

Bild
The original Weißensee Milchhäuschen demolished in 1965 (historic postcard).

Slowly Milchhäuschen regained its old charm and used it to enchant both old and new guests. Until 1965, that is. That year brought its end: rot damaged the half-timbered structure beyond repair and the historic building had to be demolished. It came as a great loss to both the locals and visitors from other boroughs and for a while it was uncertain what would follow.

It took another decade for the new Milchhäuschen to take its place – even though plans for the new building were ready in 1966. From 1976 the bright pavilion with a terrace attracted crowds again – during the day they ate their ice-cream, sipped their milkshakes or iced-coffee and in the evening enjoyed strolling around the lake and the sight of the “Milchhäuschen” neon-sign installed on its roof.

The Wende (Reunification of Germany) in 1990 almost became its end. Luckily, after several years of post-Reunification limbo, when all cards were being dealt out anew, the popular lakeside café eventually found its new owners – before it was too late. Today’s “Master of the Milk Cottage”, Sebastian Wachenbrönner, took over from his father, Oswald, who leased and renovated the venue in 1995.

Before its re-opening in 1996, today’s Milchhäuschen had to undergo extensive restoration works. As a result the interior of the 1976 pavilion had to be made anew while the new owners retained the original outer shell. It was important to keep it – not only for sentimental reasons. Unbeknownst to many, that small pavilion at the Weißer See was designed by Ludmilla Herzenstein. Her name might not tell you much but go to Karl-Marx-Allee 102-104 or 126-128 where a row of poplar trees hides the slightly set back residential buildings known as Laubenganghäuser (Balcony-Access Blocks) – the very first two buildings built in 1952 along the planned Stalinallee – and you might see the common denominator. Clean-cut, practical, simple, accessible. And with a lot of light. “Too elitist”, “too modern”, “too pre-war-like”, said the Soviet-oriented Berlin authorities promptly and introduced a new ruling style along the Stalin Boulevard.

Laubenganghaus in today’s Karl-Marx-Allee (photo own).

The Laubenganghäuser, however, could stay but that row of poplar trees before them is not a coincidence. And even years later, Ludmilla Herzenstein still believed that her design for new accommodation for the working-class Berliners would have been the right path to follow. Just as it was in 1929 when the Berlin legend of German modernist movement Neues Bauen, Bruno Taut, employed Herzenstein as the building site manager for what is known today as Onkel-Toms-Hütte or Papageinsiedlung in Berlin-Zehlendorf, one of Berlin’s Modernist heritage sites.

Today’s Wilskistraße / Rimeisterstraße in Berlin-Zehlendorf’s Onkel-Tom-Siedlung (image by GYXMZ, licence CC Wikipedia):

So that is why, thanks to an almost forgotten female Berlin architect, Ludmilla Herzenstein, right now somewhere inside the Milchhäuschen at the Weißer See there lives the spirit of Bauhaus. And is probably having a milkshake.

*Ick schwitze wie ‘n Braten! Wolln wa Eis essen? – literally: “I’m sweating like a roast! How about an ice-cream?