KREUZBERGED BERLIN

Everything You Never Knew You Wanted to Know About Berlin

EVERYBODY KNOWS ALEX – NOW AND THEN IN ALEXANDERPLATZ

Alexanderplatz, a monumental plaza in Berlin-Mitte, is the second most popular spot in the city after Kudamm. Well over 350,000 people visit it every day: it is by all means one of the busiest public spaces in Berlin. What began in the 13th century as a hospital site outside a city gate (Oderberger Tor, later known as Königstor), gained weight when re-purposed as a city market: at first, used mainly for trading cattle, it had a regular wool market added to it in the second half of the 18th century.
 
What Berliners called Ochsenmarkt or Ochsenplatz (Oxen Market or Plaza), was also used by the military: like most other Berlin markets it doubled as an exercise site for the numerous local troops. That explains the site´s other name used at the time: Paradeplatz.
 
In 1805 to honour Prussia´s big ally in the war against Napoleon, Tsar Alexander I, the plaza was christened “Alexanderplatz”. The Russian Tsar had just visited Berlin and King Friedrich Wilhelm III, Alexander´s lifelong friend, welcomed him with a lavish military parade organised just there. A couple of days after the event the plaza changed its name.
 
As for the street named after the same Russian ruler, Alexanderstrasse, it retained its original, baroque-sounding monicker – An der Contrescarpe am Stelzenkrug (Contrescarpe was the outer edge of the moat surrounding Berlin/Cöln fortifications) – until 1819.
 
The 19th century was the golden era of Alexanderplatz: the Stadtbahnof Alexanderplatz, a large city- and long-haul-train railway station which opened in 1882, allowed more and more people to contribute to the quick development of the neighbourhood. Guests arriving from outside the city were thrilled to stay at one of the 185 rooms inside the “Grand Hotel Alexanderplatz” which welcomed its first guests less than a year later.
 
After the Zentralmarkthalle, a new Central Market Hall, designed by the ingenious Hermann Blankenstein, replaced the need for the weekly market am Alex, the plaza was redesigned and received a new, far more elegant visage. Hermann Mächtig, the City Garden Director who had just turned a sandy hill in Tempelhofer Vorstadt into a stunning city park – Viktoriapark in today´s Berlin-Kreuzberg – modernised Alexanderplatz and helped it gain world fame.
 
Soon afterwards it was discovered by great Berlin department stores: Tietz, Wertheim and Hahn all wanted to partake of its prominence and unbelievably lucrative central location. Tietz, who was the first to erect his store there, needed seven years to complete his Alexanderplatz empire. But when the first section of the Warenhaus Tietz opened in 1905 (the last one was inaugurated in 1911), its 250-metre long façade was the longest department store front in the world. And it provided attractive background for the real Queen of the Plaza: Berolina. Emil Hunderieser´s giant, bronze beauty surveyed over Alexanderplatz from 1890 until 1942 when it was removed from her plinth, transported to Neukölln and later most probably melted.
 
She had to leave her post already once before that: Berolina was removed from her original spot in 1927 to carry out construction works for the extended U-Bahn station “Alexanderplatz” as well as the erection of Peter Behrens´s Alexanderhaus and Berolinahaus (both survived the war and are wonderful examples of modern pre-WWII Berlin architecture). In 1933 she returned to Alex, after the District Council of Treptow where she had been stored in the meantime refused to keep her in Treptower Park (more about it later this week). Placed in front of Behrens´s buildings she looked slightly overwhelmed and never recovered to her old glory.
 
After WWII, as an important part of East Berlin, Alexanderplatz underwent another significant metamorphosis: it was given a completely new face again. To find out more about it as well as about the role the plaza played in the last days of the DDR, watch this fascinating documentary presented last night by the Rundfunk Berlin-Brandenburg (RBB) as part of their “Geheimnisvolle Orte” (Mysterious Locations) series shown every Tuesday evening.
 
The film is, of course, in German, but even those among you not conversant in that tongue will enjoy the historic film material used for the making of the episode.
 
Make yourselves comfortable and enjoy the trip into the Past! (please click the image to enter)
Alexanderplatz in 1906: on the left, Berolina and a small section of the Tietz Warenhaus front facade.

Alexanderplatz in 1906: on the left, Berolina and a small section of the Tietz Warenhaus front facade.

 
 

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