KREUZBERGED BERLIN

Everything You Never Knew You Wanted to Know About Berlin

TODAY IN KREUZBERG: APRIL 6th – HAYDN IN JERUSALEMKIRCHE

1802

At Jerusalemkirche in Lindenstrasse in Kreuzberg the noble crowds are gathering to listen to a maginificent work of orchestral music: Die sieben letzten Worte unseres Erlösers am Kreuze (The Seven Last Words of Our Saviour On The Cross) by Franz Joseph Haydn.

Originally commissioned and composed for the Good Friday service at the cathedral in the Spanish city of Cadiz, it was performed in Berlin in one of the oldest – but sadly no longer existing – churches of the district known as Friedrichstadt (its southern end belongs to the district of Kreuzberg today, whilst the northern one is part of Berlin-Mitte).

Jerusalemkirche in 1906

Jerusalemkirche in 1906

The church itself, hit by several bombs and destroyed by the ensuing fire during the worst ever air-raids on February 3rd, 1945, was re-built after the war at a slightly different location south of the original seat (in the fork between Markgrafen- and Lindenstrasse). Having lost its original significance already long before WW2 and with the parish membership dwindling, the place was sold in the end to Romanian-Orthodox Church in 1941.

The old Jerusalemkirche Parish on Berlin map 1874 (the church marked in yellow)

The old Jerusalemkirche Parish on Berlin map 1874 (the church marked in yellow)

The original Jerusalemkirche used to stand more less where Axel-Springer-Haus was built many years later: on the corner of Lindenstrasse, Oranienstrasse and Jerusalemstrasse. A sign placed next to the building in today´s Rudi-Dutschke-Strasse shows the floor-plan of the old church and a piece of  stone decoration that was once on its façade.

A double line of red stones laid in the pavement mark the original position of the temple.

The memorial for the original Jerusalemkirche in today´s Rudi-Dutsche-Strasse (photo by Assenmacher, Wikipedia)

The memorial for the original Jerusalemkirche in today´s Rudi-Dutsche-Strasse (photo by Assenmacher, Wikipedia)

And for all lovers of classical music out there and for those willing to try it despite having entirely different musical tastes, here is the concert that the Berliners gathered in the church on April 6th, 1802 could listen to. Enjoy it!

CARE TO COMMENT?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 3,753 other followers

Archives

%d bloggers like this: