KREUZBERGED: BERLIN COMPANION

Everything You Never Knew You Wanted to Know About Berlin

UP AND AWAY WITH U1: FROM PRINZENSTRASSE TO HALLESCHES TOR

Under the viduct next to the original old English Gasworks building on the left

Under the viaduct next to the original old English Gasworks building on the left

Steel beamers and lines in Gitschiner Strasse: looks safe, is safe

Steel beamers and lines in Gitschiner Strasse: looks safe, is safe

Reparation works under the viaduct in Gitschiner Strasse

Reparation works under the viaduct in Gitschiner Strasse

This part of the viaduct was the worst damaged one after WW2 (behind the wall on the other side used to stand English Gasworks, today it´s Prinzenbad - the wet pride and joy of Kreuzberg)

This part of the viaduct was the worst damaged one after WW2 (behind the wall on the other side used to stand English Gasworks, today it´s Prinzenbad – the wet pride and joy of Kreuzberg)

U1 line passing the German Patent Office (old Kaiserlicher Patentamt) in Gitschiner Strasse

U1 line passing the German Patent Office (old Kaiserlicher Patentamt) in Gitschiner Strasse

One of the quietest and nicest places in Kreuzberg: only you, the canal, good graffiti and some 200 tonnes of steel rolling over your head

One of the quietest and nicest places in Kreuzberg: only you, the canal, good graffiti and some 200 tonnes of steel rolling over your head

The viaduct in Gitschiner Strasse shortly before Hallesches Tor

The viaduct in Gitschiner Strasse shortly before Hallesches Tor

Gitschiner Strasse: U1 line is a narrow gauge line serviced by mostly old A3-type trains

Gitschiner Strasse: U1 line is a normal gauge (143.5cm) line serviced by mostly old A3-type trains of the Kleinprofil sort (2.3m wide which was also the original width of the 1900 trams used as the model)

Landwehrkanal seen from Hallesches Tor Brücke

Landwehrkanal seen from Hallesches Tor Brücke

The no longer exisiting entrance to an underground passage at Hallesches Tor Station that led directly to U6 line

The no longer existing entrance to an underground passage at Hallesches Tor Station that led directly to U6 line and the platforms under Mehringplatz

Hallesches Tor today (opened on February 18, 1902; the underground line of U6, then Nord-Süd Bahn and Linie C, opened on January 30, 1923)

Hallesches Tor today (opened on February 18, 1902; the underground line of U6, then Nord-Süd Bahn and Linie C, opened on January 30, 1923)

First a word of explanation: there is a good reason why the text for this post is not at its beginning but serves as its tail. I do not know what WordPress are up to today and what sort of knobs they have been twiddling down in their high-tech caves but the outcome for me is that I cannot place any images on a chosen line (between paragraphs, behind the paragraphs, etc.) – they would be always snapped up to the very front of the post and “no can do” about it. I also had to embed them in a reversed order since they refuse to follow the order I put them in and do just the opposite. Moving on…

The fourth part of the journey with U1 across Kreuzberg.

The distance between Prinzenstrasse U-Bahn Station and the next stop at Hallesches Tor is relatively big: 1014 metres to be exact. Enough time to relax, look out of the window and if it is summer, curse your fate for making you sit glued to your seat in a steaming hot carriage while thousands of others are frolicking, plunging and splashing down in Prinzenbad next to the Hochbahn.

And if it´s winter, you can curse your fate for making you sit in an overheated, overcrowded train carriage while looking down onto the empty Prinzenbad, day dreaming about that wonderful frolicking, plunging and splashing that takes place there when it´s hot outside.

2 comments on “UP AND AWAY WITH U1: FROM PRINZENSTRASSE TO HALLESCHES TOR

  1. berlioz1935
    December 5, 2012

    You said the U1 is a narrow gauge line. Sorry to say, this is not correct. It is normal gauge. What it is, is called “narrow profile”. Meaning the tunnel is smaller and the carriages are not as wide as the lines 5 – 9. After the war, there was a shortage of carriages, as the Russians had taken the best ones from the D line to Moscow. Then they used some of the small profile carriages on the E line to Friedrichsfelde. They added an extra board at the doors in order not to have a big gap between the car and the platform. This was one of the curiosities after the war.

    • notmsparker
      December 5, 2012

      Thank you, Peter for pointing this out. I know you are the expert:) I would have missed my mistake here but now I know: Kleinprofil-Baureihe has nothing to do with the gauge but with the size of the carriage. I am correcting this immediately. thanx again!

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